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Why Your Human Food or Homemade Pet Food is Not Good Enough

Why human food and homemade pet food is bad for your pets

Last Updated August 11, 2020

Do you make your own pet food? Or do you ever feed your pet human food/what you have already cooked for your family? This is probably the case for some, especially during these trying times. While it might be okay to do this occasionally, we should keep in mind that our pets literally only get their nutrition from what we feed them. This means that feeding your pet homemade pet foods could potentially harm your pet by not giving them the right amounts of nutrition!

A recent study evaluating two hundred recipes obtained from 34 sources (pet care books for owners, veterinary textbooks, and homemade pet websites) was published on June 1, 2013 by the Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association (JAVMA).

The results are as follows:

Most (184 [92%]) recipes contained vague or incomplete instructions that necessitated 1 or more assumptions for the ingredients, method of preparation, or supplement-type products.

Only 3 recipes provided all essential nutrients in concentrations meeting or exceeding the NRC [National Research Council] RA [recommended allowances], and another 2 recipes provided all essential nutrients in concentrations meeting or exceeding the NRC MR [minimum requirements]… Nine recipes provided all essential nutrients in concentrations exceeding the AAFCO [Association of American Feed Control Officials] nutrient profile minimums for adult dogs; 4 of these also met or exceeded the NRC RA or NRC MR… Overall, most (190/200 [95%]) recipes resulted in at least 1 essential nutrient at concentrations that did not meet NRC or AAFCO guidelines, and many (167 [83.5%]) recipes had multiple deficiencies.

Some deficiencies were so severe that nutrient concentrations did not reach 50% of the NRC RA; these included diets deficient in vitamin D (97/102 [95.1%]), zinc (76/138 [55.1%]), choline (56/129 [43.4%]), and vitamin E (31/79 [39.2%]). Nine recipes surpassed the safe upper limit for vitamin D, and 6 surpassed the safe upper limit for the combination of EPA plus DHA [types of omega 3 fatty acids].

This study shows that a lot of these homemade pet foods are actually very much lacking in the nutrient department for your pets! This will definitely be a problem for your pets especially if they are often fed homemade meals.

So what should you do?

BidaBest healthy pet food.

If you rely on making your own pet food, make sure that you’re putting in the right ingredients. Ideally, when you make your own pet food, it should be under the guidance of a board-certified veterinary nutritionist. Finding credible recipes online might help and consulting with your local vet can surely be useful!

Alternatively, you can opt to purchase already made meals that are tested and certified to be nutritious to your pets. Our products here at BidaBest meet and exceed AAFCO standards for Growth & Reproduction and Adult Maintenance using nutritional Calculations, lab testing and feeding trials so you know that what you are feeding your pet is what they truly need!

 

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